First Nations
Cancer Screening

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO)

Regular cancer screenings mean you’re there when it matters most.

Deliverables

Campaign assets

Video

Digital advertising

Audio

Social tiles

Brief

Brief

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are 71% more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than non-indigenous Victorians. Two years of disruptions meant at-risk First Nations groups were delaying check-ups needed to catch cancer early, and catching it early is the key to improving the chances of surviving treatment.

VACCHO, the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation came to Think HQ to convince First Nations people in Victoria to take charge of their health and book in regular cancer screenings.

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Execution

Execution

Life is full of moments you don’t want to miss. A daughter’s birthday. A nephew’s graduation. The small successes and big ceremonies, celebrated alongside loved ones. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, the call to be present for others is important.

Tapping into pillars of community and kinship, the ‘Don’t Miss a Moment’ campaign recognises the bonds tying First Nation relationships together are exceptionally strong and the familial net is cast wide. Whether you’re a mother, aunty, coach or neighbour, there remains a deeply rooted cultural responsibility to ‘be there’ to support others.

By showcasing the real-life scenarios that are on the line, ‘Don’t Miss a Moment’ reminds the audience that having regular cancer screenings means you’re able to be there when it matters most. Because it only takes a moment to make sure you don’t miss a moment.

Outcome

Outcome

The ‘Don’t Miss a Moment’ campaign was developed in collaboration with Think HQ’s First Nations communications and engagement arm. To ensure the work was culturally-informed and inclusive, we worked hand-in-hand with community-controlled First Nations organisations throughout the process. Concept testing across two focus groups confirmed the sentiment struck an important and motivating chord with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander audiences.

Following testing, we produced 2 x 60” films and 1 x 30” radio spot alongside digital, social and print assets.

Launched on October 31, 2022 the materials emphasised the benefits of early cancer detection and directed the community to visit their local healthcare provider for a check-up. Keeping representation authentic, the films were led by a First Nations Director and featured real people from Aboriginal communities across Victoria.

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